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100 U.S. cities commit to 100% renewable energy

On December 5, Cincinnati, Ohio became the 100th city in the nation to establish this goal when its City Council approved a resolution committing to 100% renewable energy by 2035.

Cincinnati’s community-wide commitment builds upon its Green Cincinnati Plan from May, which commits the city to powering its municipal operations with 100% renewable energy and advances other aggressive climate measures aimed at creating an equitable energy system.

“It has become clear that cities will lead the global effort to fight climate change, and Cincinnati is on the front lines,” said Mayor John Cranley of Cincinnati, Ohio. “I am encouraged by the changes we are making, but we have a lot of work left to do.”

Recently, Cincinnati was announced as a winner of the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge. Cincinnati is the second city in Ohio to commit to an equitable and just transition to 100% clean energy, after Cleveland.

In addition to the 100 cities, the states of California and Hawaii have adopted goals to be powered entirely by renewable sources of energy, like wind and solar. The full list of commitments can be found here. Continue reading “100 U.S. cities commit to 100% renewable energy”

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China maintains top position in A Word About Wind’s 2018 Emerging Markets index

China is at the top of the list in the 2018 Emerging Markets Attractiveness Index report published by wind industry intelligence service A Word About Wind, which provides insight and analysis into the most attractive emerging markets for wind companies.

The index, now in its second year, ranks the top 30 emerging markets that investors should consider when investing in wind in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America. The list considers factors including political and economic stability for investors, alongside the growth of electricity demand and potential for wind growth, in order to rank the countries by overall potential. Continue reading “China maintains top position in A Word About Wind’s 2018 Emerging Markets index”

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Global Wind Turbine Market Value To Hit $48 Billion By 2022, Led By APAC

The global wind turbine market is expected to continue to grow over the next few years, according to new figures published by analysts GlobalData, with market value estimated to be $47.83 billion in 2022, up from $44.75 billion in 2017, driven primarily by onshore development

GlobalData published a new report last week which claimed that the global wind turbine market will surf the wave created by renewable energy global investment trends aimed at addressing power sector challenges. The authors of the report point out the obvious, that “solar and wind are prevalent due to the availability of resources across the world” and that “Power sectors in countries are moving towards improving energy security, self-sufficiency, and addressing climate change issues; driving the utilization and deployment of clean energy technologies such as wind as a power generation source.”

With regards the wind turbine market specifically, GlobalData expects the Asia Pacific region to lead the way, with a market value in 2022 of $17.24 billion and an aggregate market value of $93.85 billion. They will be followed by the EMEA region (Europe, Middle East, and Africa) with an aggregate market value of $88.77 billion — although, it’s worth noting, GlobalData expects EMEA to “outrun” the Asia Pacific region in terms of market value for offshore wind installations, as compared to wind as a whole Continue reading “Global Wind Turbine Market Value To Hit $48 Billion By 2022, Led By APAC”

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Germans to pay slightly lower levy for renewable energy in 2019

Germany will cut a green energy surcharge on consumers’ electricity bills by 5.7 percent next year, but savings for households will be limited as other fees are expected to rise.

Germans pay the highest electricity bills in Europe as state-induced taxes and fees account for over 50 percent of power bills.

German power network operators (TSOs) said on Monday that revenues collected to support green electricity are high and wholesale market prices have risen, allowing renewables producers to rely less on subsidies.

Next year the surcharge under the renewable energy act (EEG) – a fee that accounts for over a fifth of energy bills – will fall to 6.405 euro cents (7.4 US cents) per kilowatt hour (kWh), from 6.792 cents this year, TSOs said in a statement.

That was a steeper cut than forecast by industry group BEE last week, but may be offset by rises in other levies such as those on use of transport grids.

“Consumers should not pin too much hope on noteworthy price cuts by their electricity suppliers,” said Arik Meyer, managing director of SwitchUp, an online service for supplier switches. Continue reading “Germans to pay slightly lower levy for renewable energy in 2019”

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Energy Taiwan Highlights A Growing Renewable Energy Economy In Taiwan

Taiwan is physically located on a single island, but in the globalized economies of most modern nations, the focus on leveraging and strengthening its internal capabilities that locals are increasingly leveraging as a strength. The efficiencies and quality of local Taiwanese manufacturers in the solar and energy storage spaces were on full display at this years Energy Taiwan.

Energy Taiwan is the natural evolution of the predominantly solar-focused show last year into a more comprehensive show that put energy storage, wind and hydrogen fuel cell companies on display next to their silicon-cell based photovoltaic friends. This year’s show also highlights an increasing focus on Taiwan from global companies and countries looking to cash in on Taiwan’s sprint forward in a push to achieve its bold 2025 goals of deploying 5.5GW of new offshore wind capacity and 20GW of new solar installations.
Developers like Germany’s wpd, Denmark’s Ørsted and even utilities like EnBW joined the show to increase their exposure in the local market and to flesh out plans in support of the new offshore wind contracts awarded in April and June of this year. Continue reading “Energy Taiwan Highlights A Growing Renewable Energy Economy In Taiwan”

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Is Renewable Energy Ready to Topple Fossil Fuel’s Domination?

Heavy dependence on oil, gas, and coal may dissipate sooner than you think as the infrastructure matures around alternative sources like wind and solar. It seems like, in the near future, renewable-energy source technologies such as solar and wind power have a chance to surpass traditional fossil fuels in terms of usage. I mention solar and wind power because these energy generators seem to be more visible than other types of renewable energy. Being born and bred in Arizona, I’m certain that solar energy sits at the top of the list.

But, let’s step back and look at the big picture. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, renewable energy sources in 2017 collectively had a minor impact on the energy consumption in the United States (Fig. 1). Continue reading “Is Renewable Energy Ready to Topple Fossil Fuel’s Domination?”

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Offshore wind market expected to exceed $60 billion by 2024

According to a new research report by market research and strategy consulting firm, Global Market Insights Inc., the offshore wind energy market size will exceed USD $60 billion by 2024. The global offshore wind energy market has been set ablaze with a number of projects that have recently commenced power production. For instance, following the installation of its first 7-MW turbines, Scotland’s biggest offshore wind farm has sent power for the first time to the National Grid.

The Race Bank offshore wind farm in the U.K. and reportedly the fifth-largest wind farm on the planet has also officially opened recently in the month of June. This 91-turbine facility is expected to produce 573 MW of electricity and is capable of powering more than half a million homes every year. Continue reading “Offshore wind market expected to exceed $60 billion by 2024”

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No Longer a Novelty, Clean Energy Technologies Boom All Across the US

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

A new report documents the democratization of renewables, energy storage and electric vehicles in America.

It was 1997, and stakeholders were working hard to help craft the first renewable energy standard in the State of Massachusetts, which ultimately passed as part of an electric utility restructuring act. At that time, the notion that Massachusetts would be one of the top solar states in the country was almost laughable, recalls Rob Sargent, who currently leads the energy program at Environment America.

Today, renewable energy is taking off in virtually every state in the nation.

A new report and interactive map released this week by Environment America takes stock of U.S. clean energy progress to date. It finds that leadership is no longer concentrated in select parts of the country, but that it is distributed across states with varying economic and democratic makeups.

“You’re seeing an evolution that’s happening everywhere; and it will be interesting to see what will happen 10 years from now,” Sargent said.

The Renewables on the Rise report highlights how much has changed in a relatively short period of time, which can be easy to forget. Continue reading “No Longer a Novelty, Clean Energy Technologies Boom All Across the US”

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Europe is building more wind and solar — without any subsidies

The French electric utility Engie announced last week that it’s going to develop 300 megawatts of wind energy across nine wind farms in Spain, backed by $350 million (€300 million) in investment.

Here’s the key: It’s doing all this without government support. And it’s far from the only European energy company willing to make a bet like this.

In March, the Swedish power company Vattenfall announced it won its bid to build a 700 MW offshore wind farm in the Netherlands, which would make it the first nonsubsidized wind energy project in the land of windmills.

Over in Germany, in the country’s first competitive power auction last spring, the federal grid regulator accepted four bids for a total of 1,490 MW of offshore wind capacity in the North Sea, with an average subsidy rate of €0.44 per kilowatt-hour. That’s low. And why so low? Because one of the bidders, the Danish wind energy firm Dong (now Ørsted A/S), submitted a bid with a subsidy rate of zero. Continue reading “Europe is building more wind and solar — without any subsidies”

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Renewable Energy Jobs Top 10 Million Globally

Oil, natural gas, and coal may still be the dominant fuel sources in the world’s energy mix, but renewable energy is growing and creating more and more jobs worldwide.

In 2017, employment in renewable energy globally topped 10 million jobs for the first time ever, the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) said in its latest Renewable Energy and Jobs – Annual Review on Tuesday.

Last year, the renewable energy sector created more than 500,000 new jobs worldwide, and the total number of people working in the clean energy industries increased by 5.3 percent to 10.3 million, driven by strong growth in Asia, and China in particular.

The pace of growth jumped compared to the previous year, when clean energy jobs had increased by 1.1 percent to 9.8 million. Continue reading “Renewable Energy Jobs Top 10 Million Globally”