Renewable energy to replace fossil fuels as UK’s main power source for first time in history, government says

New strategy could see third of British electricity coming from offshore wind by 2030

A new government deal with industry could see nearly a third of British electricity generated by offshore wind farms by 2030.

If successful, officials say the plan would see more electricity being generated by renewables than fossil fuels for the first time in UK history, with 70 per cent coming from low-carbon sources.

Currently offshore wind provides just 7 per cent of British power, but this would be boosted to 30 per cent by the end of the next decade.

Not everyone is convinced by the announcement, with some environmentalists warning renewables would have to be scaled up even further as the nation’s nuclear ambitions floundered.

According to the government, its promised green power “revolution” would bring 27,000 jobs to the energy sector. Continue reading “Renewable energy to replace fossil fuels as UK’s main power source for first time in history, government says”

More Than 680 Gigawatts Of New Wind Power To Come Online By 2027

More than 680 gigawatts (GW) of new wind power is expected to come online around the globe in the next decade, according to new research from Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.

Wood Mackenzie announced this week that it had upgraded its Global Wind Power Market Outlook Update: Q4 2018 by 2% compared to only a quarter ago, with the majority of the expected growth to occur in the medium-term, boosting annual capacity additions from 2020 to 2023 by an average of 2.7 GW.

However, it is the long-term outlook which is most impressive, with Wood Mackenzie analysts forecasting that more than 680 GW worth of new wind power — both onshore and offshore — will be brought online through 2027.

In Europe, Wood Mackenzie expects the maturation of the region’s offshore wind sector will act as a strong driver of growth, while both Japan and South Korea are expected to boast an offshore base of over 2 GW each — not bad, considering neither country has more than 100 megawatts worth of offshore capacity. Continue reading “More Than 680 Gigawatts Of New Wind Power To Come Online By 2027”